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Dog, Cat and Small Animal Surgery

Does Your Pet Need Surgery?

Having surgery on your pet is never an easy decision. But if you’re looking for a Cleveland area veterinary hospital to assist you make a decision about your pet’s surgery or actually do the surgery, call us we can help, (440) 234-5831.

 

If desired, you can watch your pet’s surgery

Our Cleveland, OH veterinarians and veterinary medical team have done thousands of successful veterinary surgeries on dogs, cats, and pocket pets. To learn more about laser surgery, our surgical procedure, pre-anesthesia blood work, and pain management click on the appropriate topic below:

 

Pet Surgery – Repairs or Removes Something

On the left a newborn puppy from a C-Section, while on the right one of our smaller patients prior to tumor removal

The vast majority of veterinary surgeries (aka procedure or operation), either repairs something or removes something. They can also be divided into two types: Elective, ones that can be scheduled in advance because they are not an emergency, or Non-elective, ones that need to happen relatively quickly due to an urgent medical need.

Elective Veterinary Surgeries:

Here are common elective veterinary surgeries we do at Big Creek Pet Hospital (click on the specific elective veterinary surgery to learn more):

Non-Elective Veterinary Surgeries:

Non-elective veterinary surgeries are to fix a specific problem your pet has. If you are current client here, our veterinary doctor will explain: why your pet may need surgery, what are the alternatives, and what is the prognosis either if or if not your pet has surgery.

If you are not a client and we have not seen your pet, but you think your pet needs surgery, please call us to schedule a consultation with one of our doctors and we will discuss the need for your pet to have surgery.

Here is a partial list of non-elective veterinary surgeries we perform at Big Creek Pet Hospital (some of these can be clicked on for more information)

 

Elective Surgeries

Dog Neuter

A canine neuter removes the testicles and his ability to impregnate a female. Sometimes, one or both of your dog’s testicles have not descended and the surgery is slightly more extensive. It is normally done on dogs at least 6 months old, although we are recommending larger dogs (70+ lbs as an adult) wait until they are a year old. There are some preliminary studies suggesting that waiting to neuter or spay larger dogs will reduce the likelihood of orthopedic problems as an adult and senior. Typically, a dog will come in the morning, have this procedure and then be released the same day.

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Dog Spay

A canine spay removes the female’s ovaries and uterus thus her inability to have puppies. Older spayed females have a decreased chance of mammary cancer. It is normally done on dogs at least 6 months old, although we are recommending larger dogs (70+ lbs as an adult) wait until they are a year old. There are some preliminary studies suggesting that waiting to neuter or spay larger dogs will reduce the likelihood of orthopedic problems as an adult and senior. Typically, a dog will come in the morning, have this procedure and then be released the same day.

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Dog Dewclaw Removal

Dewclaw removal may be necessary if the dewclaw is deformed or if an extra dewclaw is present. Dewclaws can be removed when they are very young (3 to 5 days old) or when they are at least 4 months old. Typically, dewclaws will be removed when we neuter or spay the pet.

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Cat Neuter

Feline neuter removes the testicles and his ability to impregnate a female. It is normally, done on cats at least 6 months old. A cat being neutered, typically goes home the same day of the procedure unless also undergoing a declaw.

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Cat Spay

A feline spay removes the female’s ovaries and uterus thus her inability to have kittens. Older spayed females have a decreased chance of mammary cancer. It is normally, done on cats at least 6 months old. A cat being spayed, typically goes home the same day of the procedure unless also undergoing a declaw.

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Cat Declaw

Sometimes you are concerned about the destructiveness of your indoor cat’s claws and whether your cat should be declawed. Our medical team can explain the procedure and alternatives to declawing. Our medical team uses advanced pain management techniques to minimize problems to your cat. We also use surgical glue to seal the incisions. Which means you won’t have to use paper litter while your pet heals.

Kittens as young as 3 months can be declawed here. It can also be combined with a spay or neuter at 6 months which will save you money. While we have occasionally had to do declaws on older cats, the older the pet the more painful it is to your cat. Typically, kittens will stay overnight and have their bandages removed in the morning. Older cats may need to stay 1 or more additional nights as they heal.

3 days worth of oral pain meds will be sent home with your kitten, which can be “squirted” into your kitten’s mouth. Older cats that stay here longer will use those pain med while here.

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Stomach Tacking

Larger dogs are susceptible to Gastric Dilation Volvulus Syndrome (GDV), also know as Bloat. Bloat happens when a dog’s stomach fills with gas, food, or fluid, making it expand. The stomach puts pressure on other organs. It can cause dangerous problems, including:

  • No blood flow to his heart and stomach lining
  • A tear in the wall of his stomach
  • A harder time breathing

Stomach tacking can prevent bloat and can be done as a precaution when your pet is neutered or spayed.

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Non-Elective Surgeries

Mass or Lump Removal

Many pets will develop lumps or masses that effect their ability to walk or in extreme cases, may be cancerous. This procedure normally will be done using our laser. Mass or lump removal frequently is combined with another procedure, such as, a dental cleaning.

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Wound or Injury Repair

The difficulty of this procedure is dependent on the seriousness of the wound or injury. A small cut may be sutured or stapled as an outpatient procedure, while a “hit by a car” can take the veterinary surgeon several hours to repair.

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Foreign Body Removal

Sometimes your pet eats something they shouldn’t (underwear and socks are two favorite items). The foreign body blocks some part of the digestive tract (stomach or intestines) causing problems. In fact, Dr Fegan once removed a watch from a dog – “takes a licking but came out still ticking”. The complexity of this surgery is dependent on the item(s) ingested.

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Eyelid Surgery

Sometimes your pet’s eyelids either roll inward or outward requiring surgery to correct.

Entropian surgery is done for eyelids that roll inward. Shar Pei’s and Chow Chows,among other breeds, periodically need this surgery. Symptoms include:

  • Eyelids appear to roll inward.
  • Excessive tearing.
  • Winking.
  • Conjunctivitis – eyes will appear red or inflamed.
  • Pain. Painful eyes cause dogs to paw and rub their eyes resulting in more damage.
  • Sensitivity to light.

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Orthodpedic

We do multiple types of orthopedic surgeries including Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CCL) repairs and luxating patella repairs.

While there are three different types of CCL repairs, Dr Fegan only does ??? repairs which are not suitable for active and/or larger dogs. Typically, this procedure is done on dogs 50 lbs or less.

According to the American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  • 40-60% of dogs that have cranial cruciate ligament disease’in one knee will, at some future time, develop a similar problem in the other knee.
  • Partial tearing of the CrCL is common in dogs and progresses to a full tear over time.

Our doctors can explain each of these procedures along with non-surgical alternatives to CCL repairs.

Luxating Patella – sometimes the kneecap pops out of place and needs to be surgically repaired.

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Splenectomy

Sometimes your pet will develop a tumor on the spleen that needs to be removed. This procedure is a typical candidate for laser surgery.

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Ear Hematoma

Is when blood/fluid accumulates in the flap of your pet’s ear and causes pain in your pet until this accumulation is relieved. While the pain may subside after several days the swelling can cause permanent ear disfiguration.

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